Deutsche Kunst und Dekoration #3

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A slight return to Deutsche Kunst und Dekoration, the German periodical of art and decoration. Volume 3, which covers the period from October 1898 to March 1899, was missing from the copies stored at the Internet Archive but has recently been added to the burgeoning collection of books and journals being digitised at the University of Heidelberg. What might have been a frustrating omission turns out to be less interesting than some of the editions which followed but it still features plenty of examples of the German Art Nouveau style.

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Eritis Similis Deo (They were like God) (1896) by Félicien Rops.

Previously on { feuilleton }
Deutsche Kunst und Dekoration #25
Deutsche Kunst und Dekoration #24
Deutsche Kunst und Dekoration #23
Deutsche Kunst und Dekoration #22
Deutsche Kunst und Dekoration #21
Deutsche Kunst und Dekoration #20
Deutsche Kunst und Dekoration #19
Deutsche Kunst und Dekoration #18
Deutsche Kunst und Dekoration #16
Deutsche Kunst und Dekoration #15
Deutsche Kunst und Dekoration #12
Deutsche Kunst und Dekoration #11
Deutsche Kunst und Dekoration #10: Turin and Vienna
Deutsche Kunst und Dekoration #10: Heinrich Vogeler
Deutsche Kunst und Dekoration #9
Deutsche Kunst und Dekoration #8
Deutsche Kunst und Dekoration #7
Deutsche Kunst und Dekoration #6
Deutsche Kunst und Dekoration #5
Deutsche Kunst und Dekoration #4
Deutsche Kunst und Dekoration #2
Deutsche Kunst und Dekoration #1
Deutsche Kunst und Dekoration
Jugend Magazine revisited

Bookplates from The Studio

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Cyril Goldie.

Selections from Modern Book-plates and their Designers, an overview of British, American and European designs published by The Studio magazine in 1898. These small Studio books are always good to see, not least for the period ads in the opening and closing pages. A couple of the designs are familiar from later reprints, notably Cyril Goldie’s remarkable accumulation of thorns and skulls. Many others are in the swirling and tendrilled style of Art Nouveau which The Studio did much to promote in Britain. Also of interest are a few entries from well-known fine artists who are seldom associated with this kind of design. Among these is Belgian Symbolist Fernand Khnopff who contributes a design of his own and an article about Flemish bookplate design.

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Charles Robinson.

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PJ Billinghurst.

Continue reading “Bookplates from The Studio”

Jugend, 1899

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Continuing the delve into back issues of Jugend magazine, the German fin de siècle periodical of “art and life”, this post covers the year 1899. The earlier years of the magazine are replete with a variety of elegant and often bizarre graphics, as well as some classic examples of Art Nouveau graphic design. 1899 is the point in the magazine’s history that the variety (and, for me, the interest) begins to diminish. The covers lose their earlier inventiveness while the Art Nouveau stylings within are being replaced by drab illustrations of the German middle classes and patriotic depictions of country folk. There are still gems to be found, however, some of which follow below. As before, anyone wanting to see more of these graphics is advised to explore the bound volumes at the Heidelberg University archive. The two books for 1899 can be found here and here.

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Otto Eckman (above) and Julius Diez (below) were heavily featured in the earlier years of the magazine and Diez in particular produces some of the best work in this year’s run.

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Continue reading “Jugend, 1899”

Melancholy Lucifers

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Satan (1833).

I always enjoy it when a search for a piece of information about an artist leads to works you hadn’t come across before. Today it was a quest for the identity of the Satan statue above, created, as it turns out, by French sculptor Jean-Jacques Feuchère (1807–1852). The Louvre site has another view of what seems to have been a popular work, produced in a range of bronzes.

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I did actually know the artist’s name a few years ago since I’d used the statue as a starting point for the Satan figure on the cover of Cradle of Filth’s Lovecraft & Witch Hearts in 2002. One function of postings such as this is that it allows me to make a note of details which otherwise might flee the memory. Here Feuchère’s statue was combined with some squid tentacles and seated on an elaborate Gothic throne which is mostly obscured by the band’s name. (See a larger version sans lettering here.)

Continue reading “Melancholy Lucifers”

The White Peacock

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The White Peacock (1910).

A typical piece of mysterious erotica by Austrian illustrator and pornographer Franz von Bayros (1866–1924). Like all good Decadents, Bayros used peacocks and peacock feathers as decorative motifs in his pictures but this is the first I’ve seen where the peacock itself is the result of amorous attention. If that sounds overly-perverse, you haven’t seen his Sweet Snail.

Elsewhere on { feuilleton }
The illustrators archive

Previously on { feuilleton }
Kafka’s porn unveiled
The art of ejaculation
The art of Félicien Rops, 1833–1898