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• • • Being a journal by artist and designer John Coulthart, cataloguing interests, obsessions and passing enthusiasms.

Archive for the ‘Man Ray’ tag

 

The Strange World of Willie Seabrook by Marjorie Worthington

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This is a curious book. Marjorie Worthington (1900–1976) was the second wife of William Seabrook, an obscure figure today, known—if at all—as much for the lurid details of his life as for his books. In the 1920s and 1930s Seabrook was a well-regarded and very popular writer, delivering to the American public reports of his […]

Posted in {books}, {occult} | Comments Off

 


Weekend links 353

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The Critics (1927) by Henry Scott Tuke. • Geeta Dayal talks to ambient musician Midori Takada about Through The Looking-Glass (1983), an album being reissued this month by Palto Flats/We Release Whatever The Fuck We Want Records. • Jacob Brogan reviews The Abominable Mr. Seabrook by Joe Ollmann, a graphic biography of writer, occultist, explorer […]

Posted in {architecture}, {art}, {books}, {borges}, {comics}, {design}, {drugs}, {electronica}, {gay}, {horror}, {magazines}, {music}, {painting}, {photography}, {television} | 2 comments »

 


Anémic Cinéma

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It’s no doubt up to the viewer to decide what constitutes anaemia in Marcel Duchamp’s 7-minute film. Anémic Cinéma was made the same year as Emak-Bakia with the assistance of Man Ray and Marc Allégret. Duchamp’s Rotoreliefs spin hypnotically alternating with punning epithets in French. The spinning artworks later appeared as Duchamp’s contribution to Hans […]

Posted in {abstract cinema}, {art}, {film} | 2 comments »

 


Emak-Bakia

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Posts this week will tend towards the brief since I’m spending all my time finishing Reverbstorm. I thought I’d already posted something about Emak-Bakia, a 16-minute “cinépoème” by Man Ray from 1926, but it seems not. This is another of those short experimental films that proliferated between the wars, and a particularly inventive one with […]

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Ballet Mécanique

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A film to round off a week of connected posts. Ballet Mécanique (1924) is more Dada than Surrealist if you want to get strict about the taxonomy, but the latter movement grew out of the former, and this short experiment by Fernand Léger and Dudley Murphy is a pioneering piece of work however it’s labelled. […]

Posted in {abstract cinema}, {art}, {film} | 1 comment »

 


Dreams That Money Can Buy

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Max Ernst. The posts this week have all followed a Surrealist theme so I feel compelled to draw attention to the DVD-quality copy of Hans Richter’s Dreams That Money Can Buy (1947) at the Internet Archive. As mentioned before, Richter’s film is one of the key works of Surrealist cinema, made at the time when […]

Posted in {abstract cinema}, {animation}, {art}, {film}, {surrealism} | 2 comments »

 


Metronomes

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An automated performance of György Ligeti’s Poème symphonique for 100 metronomes at Ubuweb. Since its world premiere in the Netherlands in 1963, Poème symphonique for 100 metronomes has been very rarely performed in public. The complicated scenographic staging, the detailed preparation by hand, the need for around ten technicians to activate more or less simultaneously […]

Posted in {art}, {music}, {sculpture}, {surrealism} | 1 comment »

 


Mark Beard’s artistic circle

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The Fencing Team by Bruce Sargeant. Artists in the 20th century used to be multifarious in their activities, often taking their work through different stages or periods of evolution; Picasso and Max Ernst are two good examples of this. In today’s inflated art market this is no longer a wise move. As Brian Eno has […]

Posted in {art}, {gay}, {painting}, {sculpture} | 5 comments »

 


Entr’acte by René Clair

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One of the best—and most entertaining—films to come out of the Dada/Surrealist period, Entr’acte (1924) is also worth watching for the appearance of notable figures such as Francis Picabia (who initiated the project), Marcel Duchamp, Man Ray and Erik Satie. This extraordinary early film from director René Clair was originally made to fill an interval […]

Posted in {art}, {dance}, {film}, {surrealism} | 1 comment »

 


L’Amour Fou: Surrealism and Design

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Cadeau Audace by Man Ray (1921). L’amour fou by Robert Hughes Fur teacups, wheelbarrow chairs, lip-shaped sofas … the fashion, furniture and jewellery created by the Surrealists were useless, unique, decadent and, above all, very sexy. The Guardian, Saturday March 24th, 2007 THE VICTORIA AND Albert’s big show for this year, Surreal Things: Surrealism and […]

Posted in {art}, {design}, {fashion}, {painting}, {sculpture}, {surrealism} | 6 comments »

 


The Surrealist Revolution

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The riddle of the rocks by Jonathan Jones It was the art movement that shocked the world. It was sexy, weird and dangerous—and it’s still hugely influential today. Jonathan Jones travels to the coast of Spain to explore the landscape that inspired Salvador Dalí, the greatest surrealist of them all. The Guardian, Monday March 5, […]

Posted in {art}, {film}, {painting}, {sculpture}, {surrealism} | 6 comments »

 


Leonora Carrington

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The Guardian profiles the wonderful Leonora Carrington, one of the last of the original Surrealists. There’s little excuse for the Tate’s neglect as recounted below, Marina Warner has championed her work for years and she was the subject of a TV documentary in the BBC’s Omnibus strand in the 1990s. Maybe the Tate curators should […]

Posted in {art}, {painting}, {surrealism} | 4 comments »

 


Dada at MoMA

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(left) “Mechanical Head (Spirit of Our Age)” by Raoul Hausmann. ‘Dada’ at MoMA: The Moment When Artists Took Over the Asylum By MICHAEL KIMMELMAN Published: June 16, 2006 NOW is as good a time as any for a big museum to take another crack at Dada, which arose in the poisoned climate of World War […]

Posted in {art}, {film}, {painting}, {sculpture} | 3 comments »

 


View: The Modern Magazine

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Portrait of Charles Henri Ford in Poppy Field by Pavel Tchelitchew (1933). View magazine was an American periodical of art and literature, published quarterly from 1940 to 1947 with heavy emphasis on the Surrealist art of the period. The jaw-dropping list of contributors included: Pavel Tchelitchew, Yves Tanguy, Max Ernst, André Masson, Pablo Picasso, Henry […]

Posted in {art}, {books}, {borges}, {gay}, {magazines}, {painting}, {surrealism} | 3 comments »

 


 



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