Weekend links 461

meryon.jpg

Le Stryge (The Vampire) (1853) by Charles Méryon.

Notre-Dame-de-Paris in art and photography. Related: Chris Knapp on the Notre-Dame fire, and John Boardley on the print shops that used to cluster around the cathedral. Tangentially related: Mapping Gothic France.

The Bodies Beneath: The Flipside of British Film & Television by William Fowler and Vic Pratt will be published next month by Strange Attractor. With a foreword by Nicolas Winding Refn.

• “In his new biweekly column, Pinakothek, Luc Sante excavates and examines miscellaneous visual strata of the past.”

I also gathered underland stories, from Aeneas’s descent into Hades, through the sunken necropolises of Italo Calvino’s Invisible Cities and the Wind Cave cosmogony of the Dakota Sioux, to accounts of the many cavers, cave-divers and free-divers who have died seeking what Cormac McCarthy calls “the awful darkness inside the world”—often unable to communicate to themselves, let alone others, what metaphysical gravity drew them down to death. Why go low? Obsession, incomprehension, compulsion and revelation were among the recurrent echoes of these stories—and they became part of my underland experiences, too.

Robert Macfarlane on underworlds real and imagined, past, present and future

• Mixes of the week: FACT Mix 703 by Mary Lattimore, and The Colour Of Spring by cafekaput.

• A witty appraisal by Anna Aslanyan of a lipogrammatic classic and its smart translation.

• “Unseen Kafka works may soon be revealed after Kafkaesque trial.”

• “Why do cats love bookstores?” asks Jason Diamond.

Sunn O))) pick their Bandcamp favourites.

Le Grand Nuage de Magellan

Cathedral In Flames (1984) by Coil | The Cathedral of Tears (1995) by Robert Fripp | Cathedral Et Chartres (2005) by Jack Rose

The Turgot Map of Paris

turgot1.jpg

Yesterday’s map of Portmeirion presented a style of mapping I’ve always enjoyed, with the scale of buildings and roads exaggerated in order to give a better impression of the various locations for navigation purposes. The most elaborate example of this kind of isometric projection—indeed, the undoubted nonpareil—is the Turgot Map of Paris, named after its commissioner Michel-Étienne Turgot. The map was issued originally in a series of 20 engraved plates from 1734–1736, and for a long time I only knew of it via the (frustratingly uncredited) details printed on endpapers of the German first edition of Perfume by Patrick Süskind. Once again the web managed to solve another of those nagging artistic riddles.

turgot2.jpg

We’re told that one Louis Bretez was contracted by Monsieur Turgot to draw up the plans of the city which apparently took him two years. Once you start scrutinising the detail it’s surprising it didn’t take a lot longer. Claude Lucas was responsible for the meticulous engravings which show how Paris appeared before Baron Haussmann set to work demolishing many of the medieval streets.

turgot3.jpg

Wikimedia Commons has the entire map in a variety of sizes up to a hefty 6,552 × 5,101 pixels. At the Kyoto University Library it’s possible to view the plates individually with each plate subdivided into detailed views. There’s also a 1908 reprinting of the plates at the Internet Archive. Despite the depredations of Hausmann and co., central Paris has survived a lot better than many other European cities. London suffered so badly during the Second World War it’s a shame we don’t have an equivalent view of the pre-Luftwaffe capital.

turgot4.jpg

Elsewhere on { feuilleton }
The etching and engraving archive

Previously on { feuilleton }
In the Village
Compass roses
Charles Méryon revisited
The art of Sydney R Jones, 1881–1966
Perfume: the art of scent

Charles Méryon revisited

meryon1.jpg

Le Petit Pont (fifth state) (1850).

A short piece about the Paris etchings of Charles Méryon (1821–1868) was one of the first posts I made here. I’ve little to add to what I said four years ago other than to point out that the Internet Archive has The Etchings of Charles Méryon available for download, a rather fine collection of the artist’s Piranesi-like renderings of the city. The view below of Pont-Neuf through one of the Seine bridges is very Piranesian indeed and makes me wish Méryon had been as productive as his predecessor was with his Vedute di Roma.

meryon2.jpg

La Galerie Notre-Dame (third state) (1853).

meryon3.jpg

Le Pont-Neuf et La Samaritaine (third state) (1855).

Elsewhere on { feuilleton }
The etching and engraving archive

Previously on { feuilleton }
Vedute di Roma
Charles Méryon’s Paris

The etching and engraving archive

piranesi_tivoli.pg

Previous posts about etchings and engravings.

heyden01-150x150.jpg
Bruegel’s sins

wonders01-150x150.jpg
The World of Wonders

lucifer1-150x150.jpg
LVCIFER

trignac03-150x150.jpg
Gérard Trignac’s Invisible Cities

hugo1-150x150.jpg
La Ronde du Sabbat

meyer02-150x150.jpg
Meyer’s Todtengessängen

houplain1-150x150.jpg
Jacques Houplain’s Maldoror

kircher1-150x150.jpg
Athanasius Kircher’s Pan

fludd2-150x150.jpg
Robert Fludd’s Temples of Music

alchemy11-150x150.jpg
Musaeum Hermeticum

rodler01-150x150.jpg
Rodler’s Fine, Useful Booklet

perspective01-150x150.jpg
Rules and Examples of Perspective Proper, 1693

larousse1-150x150.jpg
Grand capitals

rentz01-150x150.jpg
Rentz’s Todentanz

rembrandt2-150x150.jpg
A Scholar in his Study

neworleans05-150x150.jpg
Old New Orleans

lesterres02-150x150.jpg
Les Terres du Ciel

mignon2-150x150.jpg
Transformations

doorway1-150x150.jpg
Doorways

durer01-150x150.jpg
Eustace details

library4-150x150.jpg
The Library of Babel by Érik Desmazières

versailles01-150x150.jpg
The labyrinth of Versailles

mm01-150x150.jpg
Atalanta Fugiens

kircher-150x150.jpg
Athanasius Kircher’s pyramids

nathist01-150x150.jpg
The Royal Natural History by Richard Lydekker

dupond-150x150.jpg
Animating Piranesi

durer2-150x150.jpg
Melencolia details

rococo6-150x150.jpg
Le style Louis XV

sealand1-150x150.jpg
Sea and Land: An Illustrated History

merigot1-150x150.jpg
Mérigot’s Ruins of Rome

fonthill1-150x150.jpg
Fonthill Abbey

turgot4-150x150.jpg
The Turgot Map of Paris

dore01-150x150.jpg
Gustave Doré’s Ancient Mariner

babel1-150x150.jpg
Athanasius Kircher’s Tower of Babel

rethel-150x150.jpg
Alfred Rethel’s Totentanz

paulini1-150x150.jpg
Paulini’s mythological alphabet

brodskyutkin-150x150.jpg
The paper architecture of Brodsky and Utkin

suite1-150x150.jpg
Six Suites of Engravings

pilecek1-150x150.jpg
The art of Jindrich Pilecek, 1944–2002

cacodaemonis-150x150.jpg
Further oddities

khunrath1-150x150.jpg
Amphitheatrum Sapientiae Aeternae

meryon1-150x150.jpg
Charles Méryon revisited

piranesi_tivoli-150x150.jpg
Carceri, thermae and candelabra

jakovenko3-150x150.jpg
Yuri Yakovenko bookplates

hollar1-150x150.jpg
Wenceslaus Hollar’s peacocks

liceti1-150x150.jpg
Liceti’s monsters

durer-150x150.jpg
Albrecht Dürer’s Triumphal Arch

speculum-150x150.jpg
Cabala, Speculum Artis Et Naturae In Alchymia

geetere3-150x150.jpg
Frans De Geetere’s illustrated Maldoror

schott1-150x150.jpg
Schott’s Physica Curiosa

grandville1-150x150.jpg
Grandville’s Un Autre Monde

salviati-150x150.jpg
The Triumph of the Phallus

denysenko1-150x150.jpg
The art of Oleg Denysenko

fencers-150x150.jpg
Nicoletto Giganti’s naked duellists

whale1-150x150.jpg
Of the Monstrous Pictures of Whales

saenredam-150x150.jpg
Jan Saenredam’s whale

alchemy1-150x150.jpg
Digital alchemy

lepautre-150x150.jpg
Oeuvres D’Architecture by Jean Le Pautre

gramato-graphices-150x150.jpg
Gramato-graphices

an2-150x150.jpg
Edward William Lane’s Arabian Nights Entertainments

bickham1-150x150.jpg
John Bickham’s Fables and other short poems

pollaiuolo-150x150.jpg
Battle of the Naked Men

houtin1.thumbnail.pg
The art of François Houtin

maldoror2.thumbnail.pg
Maldoror illustrated

reynard2.thumbnail.pg
Reynard the Fox

czanara2.thumbnail.pg
Czanara: The Art & Photographs of Raymond Carrance

empusa1.thumbnail.jpg
Empusa

piranesi_tivoli.thumbnail.pg
Hadrian and Greek love

langdale1.jpg
The art of Stella Langdale, 1880–1976

goro2.jpg
The art of Michael Goro

hoshino2.jpg
The art of Michiko Hoshino

pecoraro1.jpg
The art of Toni Pecoraro

piranesi2.jpg
Piranesi as designer

ghisi1.jpg
Giorgio Ghisi’s Allegory of Life

desmazieres1.jpg
Les lieux imaginaires d’Erik Desmazières

ward3.jpg
Gods’ Man by Lynd Ward

faed.jpg
Weel done, Cutty-sark!

iskandar.jpg
Prince Iskandar’s horoscope

brewer1.jpg
Architectural renderings by HW Brewer

midsummer.jpg
Happy Solstice

rops1.jpg
The art of Félicien Rops, 1833–1898

hernandez1.jpg
The art of José Hernández

roma2.jpg
Vedute di Roma

masereel_stadt.jpg
Frans Masereel’s city

le_brun.jpg
Charles Le Brun’s physiognomies

desmazieres1.jpg
The art of Erik Desmazières

beuchat1.jpg
The art of André Beuchat

doare1.jpg
The art of Yves Doaré

mohlitz3.jpg
The art of Philippe Mohlitz

dore_lucifer.jpg
Angels 4: Fallen angels

morell1.jpg
Abelardo Morell

piranesi.jpg
Aldous Huxley on Piranesi’s Prisons

jean_coulon.jpg
The art of Jean Coulon

trignac1.jpg
The art of Gérard Trignac

glass_stonehenge.jpg
Russian Utopia

watergate1.jpg
The Essex Street Water Gate, London WC2

bowles.jpg
The Ranelagh Rotunda

peter_milton2.jpg
The art of Peter Milton

a0000f80.jpg
Saint-Aubin’s Butterfly People

prm135x.jpg
Filippo Morghen’s Voyage to the Moon

meryon.jpg
Charles Méryon’s Paris

atlas_coelestis1.jpg
The Atlas Coelestis of Johann Gabriel Doppelmayr

More archive pages:
The archive page archive

On the move

stryge.jpg

Le Stryge by Charles Méryon (1853).

“These writings, which deal with the Parisian arcades, were begun under a clear sky of cloudless blue that curved over the arcade; even so they are covered with a dust hundreds of years old by the millions of pages in which the fresh wind of diligence, the heavy breath of the scholar, the storm of young zeal and the slow gentle breeze of curiosity rustled. For the painted summer sky, which looks down from the arcades to the study of the Parisian Bibliothèque Nationale, has spread its dreamy, lightless cover over them.”

Walter Benjamin, Passagenwerk.

Off to Paris again for a week to explore some of Walter’s arcades.