{ feuilleton }

Avatar

• • • Being a journal by artist and designer John Coulthart, cataloguing interests, obsessions and passing enthusiasms.


 

Weekend links 192

fournier.jpg

“Chloromgonfus detectis, a dragonfly that can detect volatile pollutants.” A speculative insect by artist Vincent Fournier.

• “…a modern taxonomist straddling a Wellsian time machine with the purpose of exploring the Cenozoic era…” Butterflies tied together Vladimir Nabokov’s home, science, and writing, says Mary Ellen Hannibal.

• More ghosts: Kira Cochrane on the Victorian tradition of the Christmas ghost story, and Michael Newton on why Jack Clayton’s The Innocents (1961) remains one of the very best ghost films. No argument there.

• Should you require further persuasion, Daniel Barrow reviews I Am The Center: Private Issue New Age Music In America 1950-1990, an album still receiving heavy rotation in these quarters.

Swords, daggers—weapons with a blade—retained a mysterious, talismanic significance for Borges, imbued with predetermined codes of conduct and honor. The short dagger had particular power, because it required the fighters to draw death close, in a final embrace. As a young man, in the 1920s, Borges prowled the obscure barrios of Buenos Aires, seeking the company of cuchilleros, knife fighters, who represented to him a form of authentic criollo nativism that he wished to know and absorb.

The Daggers of Jorge Luis Borges by Michael Greenberg

The Junky’s Christmas (1993): a seasonal tale from William Burroughs turned into a short animated film by Nick Donkin and Melodie McDaniel.

• Mixes of the week: Secret Thirteen Mix 101 by Jan Jelinek, and The Conjuror’s Hexmas by Seraphic Manta.

• Meet the 92-year-old Egyptian [Halim El-Dabh] who invented electronic music.

The Mysterious Lawn Home of Frohnleiten, Austria.

The Peacock Room at Sammezzano Castle in Italy.

The Quay Brothers’ Universum.

Alan Bennett‘s diary for 2013.

Butterfly (1968) by Can | Butterfly (1974) by Herbie Hancock | Butterfly (1998) by Talvin Singh

 


 

Posted in {animation}, {architecture}, {art}, {books}, {borges}, {burroughs}, {drugs}, {electronica}, {film}, {horror}, {music}, {science fiction}, {science}, {sculpture}.

Tags: , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , .

 


 


 

One comment or trackbacks

  1. #1 posted by TJ

    gravatar

    “Halim El-Dabh who invented electronic music”

    I think not. He may have been the first to manipulate recorded sound, which falls into the “electroacoustic” category. But then, Winston Kock invented the first electronic organ (sounds produced by neon oscillators) in 1933 … when he played it that was electronic music. And Thaddeus Cahill patented his telharmonium in 1897 (each pitch produced by a dynamo), and that too was electronic music.

    “First” is always a dangerous adjective; it presupposes that we are aware of all antecedents … usually unlikely (but less so in recent years).

 




 

tracker

 


 

“feed your head”