Hector Guimard sketches

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Projet pour la couverture Revue d’art (1899).

French architect and designer Hector Guimard (1867–1942) is most renowned today for his entrances to the Paris Metro but his work extended from architecture to interior and graphic design, much of it a superior application of the Art Nouveau style. Le cercle Guimard is a site devoted to the designer’s work (French-only for now) while these sketches are from a substantial collection at the Musée d’Orsay, Paris.

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Projet de demi-canapé pour Mme Legrand (1900).

Previously on { feuilleton }
Temples for Future Religions by François Garas
Elizabetes Iela 10b, Riga
Atelier Elvira
Louis Bonnier’s exposition dreams
The Maison Lavirotte
The House with Chimaeras

The Maison Lavirotte

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More Art Nouveau and more Paris…. I can’t believe I missed this place when I was in Paris for a week, staying just a few streets away. The building is at 29 Avenue Rapp in the 7th arrondissement and I crossed that street several times when walking to the Champs de Mars and the Eiffel Tower.

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The architect was Jules Lavirotte (1864–1929) and the building was named after him following its construction in 1901. His other works aren’t as excessively florid as this, nor do they display the Nouveau elegance of contemporaries such as Hector Guimard, so this façade may owe more to the capitulations of fashion than innate style. The attractively unclad figures on the pediment cock their hips at passers-by in a provocative manner that would never be allowed in British architecture of the period, and the door has some great details with stylised peacocks between the windows and a huge brass lizard for the handle.

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Paris V: Details

Final Paris posting here, gathering up more of the better photos.

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Walk down any residential street and you’ll see amazing doors like this that lead to the courtyards of apartment blocks. All the decorations are different, as are the brass door-handles emblazoned with human or animal heads. You could spend months photographing them.

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