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• • • Being a journal by artist and designer John Coulthart, cataloguing interests, obsessions and passing enthusiasms.


 

William Strang’s Baron Munchausen

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The paintings and illustrations of Scottish artist William Strang (1859–1921) were much more typical of their time than the bold drawings in this 1895 edition of Rudolf Erich Raspe’s tall tales. Not all the illustrations are Strang’s work, some are by JB Clark, and there are many more in the book as a whole. Years later, the Gollancz publishing company was based next door to Lawrence & Bullen’s former home at 14 Henrietta Street.

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Elsewhere on { feuilleton }
The illustrators archive

 


 

Posted in {art}, {black and white}, {books}, {fantasy}, {illustrators}.

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6 comments or trackbacks

  1. #2 posted by John

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    As you know, I have reservations about some of Gilliam’s films but I’ve always liked that one. The only one I’ve seen at a cinema as it happens. He was working on it when he appeared in a room I was in during one of the London comic conventions. I was stood in line at the time, waiting to get Moebius’s signature for a friend; Gilliam was there waiting for Harvey Kurtzman to finish his own signing session. I had all my Cthulhu artwork with me, and was tempted to foist it on TG but didn’t. I’d only have been fishing for compliments which is a bad thing to indulge.

  2. #3 posted by Gabriel McCann

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    Interesting that you almost got to meet and talk to him unexpectedly. I’m off to see his latest in a couple of weeks playing at a small trendy cinema here in Sydney. His films don’t have megabudget advertising behind them to sell them to the public in the larger multicinemas theses days …
    http://ourgoldenage.com.au/film/the-zero-theorem/

  3. #4 posted by John

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    He was wearing the same coat you see him wear at the beginning of Michael Palin’s Around the World… which I think would have begun filming shortly before or after the convention. I did send TG a copy of The Haunter of the Dark later on although I never had a response. Sent one to Jodorowsky as well but never had a response from him either!

    Last TG film I saw was the one about trying to make Don Quixote. At least he’s still getting films made. At the moment he’s directing a Berlioz opera in London:

    http://www.theguardian.com/music/2014/jun/03/terry-gilliam-opera-diary-benvenuto-cellini-berlioz-eno

  4. #5 posted by Gabriel McCann

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    Thanks for the link.
    Parnassus is worth seeing for the visuals alone. The story is a bit of a mishmash but it looks incredible. Also some parts of it were shot in London so it might be fun for you to spot places I have been to physically that appear in the movie.

    http://www.smart.co.uk/dreams/parnfact.htm

 


 

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