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• • • Being a journal by artist and designer John Coulthart, cataloguing interests, obsessions and passing enthusiasms.


 

Ye Sundial Booke

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I almost posted this in place of The Book of Old Sundials but to have done so would have made the former volume redundant. This is the same idea—pen drawings of British sundials with accompanying pages of sundial mottos—but a much more comprehensive treatment. The antiquated title is an affectation by its author, T. Geoffrey W. Henslow, the book having been published in 1914. What’s most remarkable about this study is the 370 drawings by Dorothy Hartley (1893–1985), a job of illustration that must have involved considerable labour even if she was working from photographs. Looking for details of Ms Hartley’s career it’s possible she researched the sites herself. In addition to being an illustrator and art teacher she was also a noted social historian and rural archivist, and author of a celebrated book of culinary history, Food in England (1954), which is still in print today.

These page selections do little more than scratch the surface of this extraordinary book. Browse the rest of it here or download it here. For more about Dorothy Hartley and her historical research there’s an hour-long BBC documentary, Food in England: The Lost World of Dorothy Hartley.

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Previously on { feuilleton }
The Book of Old Sundials

 


 

Posted in {architecture}, {art}, {books}, {illustrators}.

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2 comments or trackbacks

  1. #1 posted by herr doktor bimler

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    In the ideal world, there would be at least one M.R. James ghost story revolving around a sundial.

  2. #2 posted by John

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    The globe in the maze in Mr. Humphries and His Inheritance is the closest I can think of.

 


 

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