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• • • Being a journal by artist and designer John Coulthart, cataloguing interests, obsessions and passing enthusiasms.


 

Calendrier Magique

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The Calendrier Magique was created in 1895 by Austin De Croze, with pages decorated and illustrated by Manuel Orazi. In addition to being a calendar for the year 1896, the booklet (which was printed in an edition of 777 copies) is also a fascinating bogus grimoire which did the internet rounds a few years ago when scans appeared on a sub-site hosted by Cornell University Library. While it was good to see the pages at all, I’m sure I wasn’t the only one who would have preferred a closer look at the details, something which is now possible thanks to a recent upload at Gallica.

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The Gallica copy is also downloadable as a PDF so there’s no need to replicate all the contents here. Something worth noting which did occur to me when I first saw Orazi’s drawings was the striking similarity of the letterform sigils and the doodle-like figure below to the later, more seriously-intended occult art of Austin Spare. Neither Orazi nor the Calendrier Magique receives a mention in Phil Baker’s biography of Spare but a copy of the calendar could have made its way to a London book shop where Spare might have seen it.

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Previously on { feuilleton }
Typefaces of the occult revival
Manuel Orazi’s Salomé
La belle sans nom

 


 

Posted in {art}, {books}, {occult}.

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2 comments or trackbacks

  1. #1 posted by Geoff

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    These are fantastic images, thanks for posting. My first impression was that there was a similarity with Willy Pogany’s illustrations for the three Wagner volumes. And just searching for Orazi’s art I came across an image ‘Aventures merveilleuses de Huon de Bordeaux’ which is incredibly like these Pogany illustrations (or vice versa!)

  2. #2 posted by John

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    Hi Geoff. Yes, there is some similarity although Pogany’s work in the Wagner books is less loose than here. I think the looseness was probably deliberate to give the whole thing the feeling of something handmade.

    Thanks for the Orazi tip, I’d not seen anything from that book before.

 




 

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