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• • • Being a journal by artist and designer John Coulthart, cataloguing interests, obsessions and passing enthusiasms.

Archive for the ‘stained glass’ tag


Harry Clarke and others in The Studio


The Swing by Alan Odle. The University of Heidelberg has for some time now had several years of British art magazine The Studio in its archive but I’ve yet to delve fully into the later issues. These illustrations are from two articles from the volumes covering the year 1925, both of which feature the exceptional […]

Posted in {art}, {beardsley}, {black and white}, {books}, {illustrators}, {magazines} | 4 comments »


Copying Clarke


“On to the brocken the witches are flocking.” From Faust (1925) by Harry Clarke. Spotted earlier this week, a rather blatant swipe from Harry Clarke’s Faust by an unknown cover artist for the Avon Fantasy Reader. Such borrowings weren’t uncommon in the pulp magazines—the pressure of deadlines no doubt encouraged them—and I’ve logged a couple […]

Posted in {art}, {books}, {fantasy}, {illustrators}, {magazines}, {pulp} | 2 comments »


Harry Clarke’s Fairy Tales of Charles Perrault


After posting John Austen’s Perrault illustrations I intended to follow-up with other versions but work has been non-stop lately so it’s taken most of this month to do so. Harry Clarke’s edition of Perrault was published in 1922, and while it’s not exactly unfamiliar its one of his illustrated editions that gets overshadowed by the […]

Posted in {art}, {books}, {fantasy}, {illustrators} | 1 comment »


NY, NY, a film by Francis Thompson


In Heaven and Hell (1956) Aldous Huxley considers various forms of art that might be said to imitate or resemble the intense visuals generated by psychedelic agents. In past centuries this would include firework displays and the vivid hues of stained glass windows; when discussing the present, mention is made of NY, NY, a short […]

Posted in {abstract cinema}, {film}, {psychedelia} | 2 comments »


Harry Clarke in colour


Older illustrated books often suffer at the hands of owners or a certain breed of iniquitous antique dealer who razor out their colour plates in order to frame them as prints. The Internet Archive has two copies of The Year’s at the Spring; An Anthology of Recent Poetry (1920) edited by Lettice D’Oyly Walters, and illustrated […]

Posted in {art}, {books}, {illustrators} | 2 comments »


Harry Clarke and the Elixir of Life


A little something for the season of strong drink. Harry Clarke’s books command high prices in their original editions yet two of the costliest items in the Clarke bibliography are a pair of promotional booklets the artist illustrated for Jameson & Son’s Irish Whiskey: A History of a Great House in 1924, and Elixir of […]

Posted in {art}, {books}, {illustrators} | 3 comments »


Mervyn Peake in Coronation Street


First paperback edition of Titus Groan, 1968. If you’re British then, no, it isn’t what you think. Having mentioned my hometown of Blackpool yesterday there’s one detail about the town I usually regard as an annex of Hell which, if not quite a saving grace, raises it into some lesser locus of perdition. There are […]

Posted in {architecture}, {books}, {drugs}, {fantasy} | 5 comments »


The Worlds of Mervyn Peake


Illustration by Mervyn Peake for The Sphinx by Oscar Wilde (1949). The centenary of writer, artist and poet Mervyn Peake is being celebrated this year with a number of events in the UK. Mervyn Peake: A Centenary Celebration is a small exhibition of Peake’s drawings which has been running since April at the Pallant House […]

Posted in {art}, {books}, {fantasy}, {illustrators} | 4 comments »


Deutsche Kunst und Dekoration #21


The Eternal Idol by Auguste Rodin. Continuing the delve into back numbers of Deutsche Kunst und Dekoration, the German periodical of art and decoration. Volume 21 covers the period from October 1907 to March 1908, and the highlight of this issue is a feature on the black-and-white art of Julius Klinger, an artist whose drawings […]

Posted in {architecture}, {art}, {black and white}, {design}, {illustrators}, {magazines}, {religion}, {sculpture} | 2 comments »


The Ursulines’ winter garden


Another winter garden, this addition to the Institute of the Ursulines, a Catholic school in Onze-Lieve-Vrouw-Waver, Belgium, is a lot smaller than previous examples but is celebrated for its beautiful Art Nouveau-styled stained glass canopy. The winter garden was added to the main building in 1900 and—surprisingly—no one seems to know who the architect was. […]

Posted in {architecture}, {art nouveau}, {design}, {photography} | 2 comments »


Deutsche Kunst und Dekoration #1


Last year saw an exploration here of the fecund pages of Jugend magazine so in the same spirit I’m embarking on a serial delve into Jugend‘s more serious contemporary Deutsche Kunst und Dekoration. I’ve made a couple of posts in this direction already but these were done before I’d had a chance to look properly […]

Posted in {art nouveau}, {art}, {black and white}, {design}, {illustrators}, {magazines}, {painting}, {religion}, {symbolists} | 3 comments »


Cardwell Higgins versus Harry Clarke


A Delightful Page in the Record of My Existence. This picture popped up at Chateau Thombeau a few days ago and it’s also been circulating in Tumblr’s recursive labyrinth. The very obvious debt to Harry Clarke’s black-and-white style caught my attention, especially to the artist’s Poe illustrations with the reclining woman being a blatant swipe […]

Posted in {art}, {black and white}, {illustrators} | 6 comments »


Modern book illustrators, 1914


The Rime of the Ancient Mariner by Harry Clarke. Some samples from a collection of mostly black-and-white drawing at the Internet Archive, Modern Book Illustrators and Their Work (1914), edited by C. Geoffrey Holme & Ernest G. Halton. This was an illustration review produced by The Studio magazine and in this edition happens to feature […]

Posted in {art}, {black and white}, {books}, {illustrators} | 1 comment »


Illustrating Poe #3: Harry Clarke


And so to the master. Harry Clarke’s illustrated edition of Tales of Mystery and Imagination was published by Harrap in 1919, with a new edition following in 1923 that featured an additional series of colour plates. I can’t imagine anyone ever producing a better illustrated version of Poe than Clarke managed, the morbid quality which […]

Posted in {art}, {black and white}, {books}, {film}, {horror}, {illustrators}, {work} | 2 comments »


Schloss Linderhof


More Ludwigiana. Schloss Linderhof was Ludwig II of Bavaria’s miniature Versailles at Oberammergau and is a key location in Visconti’s film about the King. The house itself is a riot of gilded rococo which isn’t really to my taste but you can make your own judgement by taking a tour at the palace website or […]

Posted in {architecture}, {art}, {design}, {fantasy}, {film}, {photography}, {symbolists} | 3 comments »


Strangest Genius: The Stained Glass of Harry Clarke


I mentioned Harry Clarke’s stained glass work last year since Flickr now has some decent photos of Clarke’s incredible window designs. Published this month is Strangest Genius: The Stained Glass of Harry Clarke by Lucy Costigan and Michael Cullen, the first proper book-length study of the windows and other stained glass work produced by the […]

Posted in {art}, {books}, {illustrators}, {religion} | 15 comments »


The art of Melchior Lechter, 1865–1937


The first issue of yesterday’s arts and crafts magazine Deutsche Kunst und Dekoration includes an article about Melchior Lechter, a German artist and designer whose illustration work I knew from books by gay poet Stefan George but who seems unjustly neglected by fin de siècle art histories. The reminder prompted me to search a bit […]

Posted in {architecture}, {art nouveau}, {art}, {black and white}, {books}, {design}, {illustrators}, {religion} | 1 comment »


A profusion of Peake


Bellgrove, young Titus and Barquentine by Mervyn Peake. Case designed by Robert Hollingsworth. I’d thought about posting the covers of my boxed set of Gormenghast paperbacks a couple of years back when there was a flurry of blogospheric attention being given to Penguin cover designs…thought about it then never got round to it. The reason […]

Posted in {art}, {books}, {design}, {fantasy}, {illustrators}, {painting} | 6 comments »


Joseph Cavalieri’s stained glass


The Good Ship Ménage À Trois (2008). New York artist Joseph Cavalieri‘s stained glass work using Simpsons characters received a flurry of blogospheric attention recently. Of more interest for me is his gay-themed panels like the one above which show a different approach to the medium from that taken by Diego Tolomelli. Gormenghast (2009). And […]

Posted in {art}, {books}, {fantasy}, {gay} | 4 comments »


Luke Jerram’s Glass Microbiology


Large E-Coli. Or art as virus…. Just because micro-organisms can make us seriously ill doesn’t mean they can’t be beautiful. Luke Jerram‘s glass renderings of some of the most deadly examples are on display at the Smithfield Gallery, London, until October 3rd. The sculptures were designed in consultation with virologists from the University of Bristol […]

Posted in {art}, {science}, {sculpture} | 3 comments »







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