Temples for Future Religions by François Garas

garas1.jpg

Temple à la Pensée, dédié à Beethoven, vue en cours de construction (1897).

Another artist discovered whilst searching for something quite unrelated. The Musée d’Orsay are custodians of this drawing by François Garas (1866–1925), and they also have the most substantial appraisal of his career.

François Garas remains a mysterious architect, whose artistic pantheon included Baudelaire and Edgar Allan Poe, as well as John Ruskin, Richard Wagner, Jean Carriès and Edouard Manet. He obtained his diploma in 1894, and until 1914 regularly exhibited utopian architectural projects at the Salon de la Société Nationale des Beaux Arts. His career started with the exhibition Architects’ Impressions in 1896 at the Le Barc de Bouteville gallery, alongside his fellow architects Henri Sauvage, Henry Provensal and Gabriel Guillemonat. This exhibition, accompanied by a rebellious booklet by the architect Frantz Jourdain, wanted to get rid of “the mental slavery produced by the exclusive study of Greek and Roman architecture, and by a knowledge of nothing but the Italian Renaissance”. This drawing featured in the exhibition; then it was seen again, the same year, in an exhibition by the Société Nationale des Beaux Arts, as part of a collection entitled Artists’ Interiors.

From 1897, Garas exhibited increasingly oneiric projects at the Salon – “temples for future religions”, dedicated to Beethoven, Wagner, Life, Death and Thought. While his companions from the early days were designing social housing, Garas continued along the same fanciful path, then disappeared from the architectural scene without any of his projects ever having been built.

garas3.jpg

Temple à la Pensée, dédié à Beethoven, vue perspective depuis l’arrière du temple (1897).

garas4.jpg

Temple à la Pensée, dédié à Beethoven, visions du temple, clair de lune (1900).

The museum has several pages of various plans and sketches for these Temples for Future Religions, and also some quasi-Gothic designs for “Artist’s interiors” which would benefit from being seen at a larger size. Among his other works are a series of very diffuse pastel studies which look more like Claude Monet drawing the ruins of Angkor than architectural designs.

garas2.jpg

Un temple pour les religions futures (1901).

Previously on { feuilleton }
Exposition Universelle publications
Exposition cornucopia
Return to the Exposition Universelle
The Palais Lumineux
Louis Bonnier’s exposition dreams
Exposition Universelle, 1900
The Palais du Trocadéro
The Evanescent City

The fantastic art archive

larkin_fantastic.jpg

Previous posts about fantastic, surreal or visionary artists.

benoit03-150x150.jpg
The Execution of the Testament of the Marquis de Sade by Jean Benoît

fuchs12-150x150.jpg
Ernst Fuchs, 1977

fuchs4-150x150.jpg
Ernst Fuchs, 1930–2015

ak06-150x150.jpg
The art of Aleksandr Kosteckij

clerici1-150x150.jpg
The art of Fabrizio Clerici, 1913–1993

linford1-150x150.jpg
The art of Victor Linford, 1940–2002

giger2-150x150.jpg
Heimkiller and High

giger-150x150.jpg
The Man Who Paints Monsters In The Night

ruppert-giger-150x150.jpg
Hans by Sibylle

mathieux-marie1-150x150.jpg
The art of Jean-Michel Mathieux-Marie

rimbault2-150x150.jpg
Gilles Rimbault redux

goodwin7-150x150.jpg
Albert Goodwin’s fantasies

cat08-150x150.jpg
The art of Roland Cat

gleeson1-150x150.jpg
The art of James Gleeson, 1915–2008

sime2-150x150.jpg
Sidney Sime paintings

chrobak1-150x150.jpg
The art of Joanna Chrobak

giger21-150x150.jpg
Giger’s Tarot

giger3-150x150.jpg
Giger’s Necronomicon

cole1-150x150.jpg
The art of Thomas Cole, 1801–1848

bertrand17-150x150.jpg
Raymond Bertrand paintings

bertrand15-150x150.jpg
Raymond Bertrand’s science fiction covers

hoffman-150x150.jpg
Visionaries: The Art of the Fantastic

starowieyski1-150x150.jpg
Starowieyski in Switzerland

toledo1-150x150.jpg
The art of Luis Toledo

brissot2-150x150.jpg
Jacques Brissot’s Hay Wain

styrsky2-150x150.jpg
The art of Jindrich Styrsky, 1899–1942

venosa-150x150.jpg
The art of Robert Venosa, 1936–2011

harter4-150x150.jpg
Initiations in the Abyss: A Surrealist Apocalypse

pennington-eschatus1-150x150.jpg
The fantastic and apocalyptic art of Bruce Pennington

kryvosej1-150x150.jpg
The art of Leonidas Kryvosej

johfra1-150x150.jpg
The art of Johfra Bosschart, 1919–1998

zotl-150x150.jpg
The art of Aloys Zötl, 1803–1887

ruppert1-1-150x150.jpg
Sibylle Ruppert revisited

ruppert1-150x150.jpg
Sibylle Ruppert, 1942–2011

williams-150x150.jpg
In the Land of Retinal Delights

rimbault1-150x150.jpg
Gilles Rimbault revisited

wittfooth1-150x150.jpg
The art of Martin Wittfooth

willink1-150x150.jpg
The art of Carel Willink, 1900–1983

satty2-150x150.jpg
Wilfried Sätty: Artist of the occult

akiyoshi1-150x150.jpg
The art of Ran Akiyoshi, 1922–1982

rimbault1-150x150.jpg
The art of Gilles Rimbault

hutter1-150x150.jpg
The art of Michael Hutter

heffernan-150x150.jpg
Boy, O Boy by Julie Heffernan

leon1-150x150.jpg
The art of Jim Leon, 1938–2002

ernst-150x150.jpg
Surrealist echoes

hogin1-150x150.jpg
The art of Laurie Hogin

minnen1-150x150.jpg
The art of Christian rex Van Minnen

fini-150x150.jpg
Angels of Anarchy: Women Artists and Surrealism

denysenko1-150x150.jpg
The art of Oleg Denysenko

schuiten1-150x150.jpg
The art of François Schuiten

ruppert1-150x150.jpg
The art of Sibylle Ruppert

redon1-150x150.jpg
The eyes of Odilon Redon

foerester-150x150.jpg
Fata Morgana: The New Female Fantasists

starowieyski-150x150.jpg
Franciszek Starowieyski, 1930–2009

indrikov2-150x150.jpg
The art of Boris Indrikov

abraxas.thumbnail.pg
The art of Mati Klarwein, 1932–2002

clayette3.thumbnail.pg
The art of Pierre Clayette, 1930–2005

hpl1.thumbnail.pg
The monstrous tome

dadd.thumbnail.jpg
A Midsummer Night’s Dadd

ian_miller6.thumbnail.jpg
The art of Ian Miller

fini.thumbnail.jpg
The art of Leonor Fini, 1907–1996

henricot1.thumbnail.jpg
The art of Michel Henricot

taillefer.thumbnail.jpg
The art of Heidi Taillefer

hoenerloh.thumbnail.jpg
Set in Stone

sculpture.thumbnail.jpg
Against Nature: The hybrid forms of modern sculpture

faccon1.thumbnail.jpg
The art of Jean-Paul Faccon

severynko1.jpg
The art of Andrew Severynko

gammell.jpg
The Hound of Heaven by RH Ives Gammell

carries_frog.jpg
The art of Jean Carriès, 1855–1894

hyde.jpg
Visions and the art of Nick Hyde

heffernan1.jpg
The art of Julie Heffernan

brewer.jpg
Custom creatures

hitchcock.jpg
The art of Harold Hitchcock

arrivabene1.jpg
The art of Agostino Arrivabene

yamamoto3.jpg
The art of Takato Yamamoto

nobeast1.jpg
The art of NoBeast

airship.jpg
A Madmen’s Museum

avinoff1.jpg
The art of Andrey Avinoff, 1884–1949

berrini.jpg
Imaginary maps by Francesca Berrini

sultana.jpg
The art of Jacques Sultana

larkin_fantastic.jpg
Fantastic art from Pan Books

benoit11.jpg
The art of Jean Benoît

.jpg
The art of Bertrand

matter1.jpg
Pierre Matter’s cyborg sculpture

hernandez1.jpg
The art of José Hernández

czanara.jpg
Czanara’s Hermaphrodite Angel

aparin1.jpg
The art of Sergei Aparin

verlato.jpg
The art of Nicola Verlato

aldrich.jpg
The art of Stephen Aldrich

hausner1.jpg
The art of Rudolf Hausner, 1914–1995

desmazieres1.thumbnail.jpg
The art of Erik Desmazières

codex.jpg
The Codex Seraphinianus

tanning.jpg
Surrealist women

leonora.jpg
Leonora Carrington

cole_goblet.jpg
Two American paintings

lucifer.jpg
The art of Thomas Häfner, 1928–1985

alemany.jpg
The art of Arnau Alemany

ricaud1.jpg
The art of Jean Louis Ricaud

trignac1.jpg
The art of Gérard Trignac

emoto.jpg
The Museum of Fantastic Specimens

Arch_Evil.jpg
The art of Franz Xavier Messerschmidt, 1736–1783

fuchs-janus.jpg
The art of Ernst Fuchs

Labattoir.jpg
The art of Jean-Marie Poumeyrol

magritte.jpg
Las Pozas and Edward James

jpu.jpg
The art of Jean-Pierre Ugarte

ljuba.jpg
The art of Ljuba Popovic

Stanislav_Szukalski.jpg
The art of Stanislav Szukalski, 1893–1987

More archive pages:
The archive page archive

The art of Jean Carriès, 1855–1894

carries_frog.jpg

The Frog with Rabbit Ears (1891).

La matière de l’étrange, an exhibition of ceramic grotesques by Jean Carriès is currently running at the Petit Palais, Paris, through to January 27th, 2008. Carriès doesn’t feature in any of my books about eccentric or fantastic artists which I find surprising, his work is very peculiar by 19th century standards, looking like the creation of a Rodin obsessed by Lautréamont. Carriès’ series of “horror masks” are so similar to the earlier series of heads by sculptor Franz Messerschmidt I suspect there may be an influence there. And like Rodin, Carriès also had unsuccessful plans for a monumental gateway ornamented with his figures and scowling faces. Unlike Rodin, his plaster draft of the work was destroyed by a criminally unsympathetic curator but the Petit Palais exhibition attempts a reconstruction based on a model by Eugène Grasset.

Thanks to Nathalie for the tip!

English article at The Art Tribune
French page with video of the exhibition

carries_faun.jpg

Head of a Faun (1890–92?).

carries_mask.jpg

Grotesque mask, element for the Monumental Door (1891–94).

Elsewhere on { feuilleton }
The fantastic art archive

Previously on { feuilleton }
The Masks of Medusa
Bernini’s Anima Dannata
The art of Franz Xaver Messerschmidt, 1736–1783
The art of Stanislav Szukalski, 1893–1987