The art of Carel Willink, 1900–1983

willink1.jpg

Townscape (1934).

Carel Willink was a Dutch painter whose self-described brand of “imaginary realism” conjured in its early years a collection of views of desolate plazas, empty lanes and abandoned ruins over which smoke or cloud hangs like an ominous portent. The works of Giorgio de Chirico and Paul Delvaux come to mind when looking at these pictures although Willink’s work has enough unique qualities to stand apart from his more famous contemporaries. I’m also reminded a little of Spanish artist Arnau Alemany who has a similar predilection for isolated architecture.

willink2.jpg

Chateau in Spain (1939).

There’s an official Willink website here, while further paintings can be seen at this Flickr set and also at Ten Dreams.

Elsewhere on { feuilleton }
The fantastic art archive

Previously on { feuilleton }
Bruges-la-Morte
Taxandria, or Raoul Servais meets Paul Delvaux
The art of Arnau Alemany

David Trautimas

trautimas.jpg

The Fishing Complex (2008).

Canadian artist David Trautimas re-purposes household and other objects into fantasy buildings by exaggerating their scale then montaging them into landscapes. This example is from his Habitat Machines series; there’s also an Industrial Parkland series. Many of the former group are pleasantly convincing, and their weathered appearance adds to the impression of having discovered the works of a lost Modernist architect. Some of these are like digital equivalents of paintings by Arnau Alemy.

Via Things Magazine.

Previously on { feuilleton }
The art of Arnau Alemany

The fantastic art archive

larkin_fantastic.jpg

Previous posts about fantastic, surreal or visionary artists.

mnemos2-150x150.jpg
Beksinski at Mnémos

benoit03-150x150.jpg
The Execution of the Testament of the Marquis de Sade by Jean Benoît

fuchs12-150x150.jpg
Ernst Fuchs, 1977

fuchs4-150x150.jpg
Ernst Fuchs, 1930–2015

ak06-150x150.jpg
The art of Aleksandr Kosteckij

clerici1-150x150.jpg
The art of Fabrizio Clerici, 1913–1993

linford1-150x150.jpg
The art of Victor Linford, 1940–2002

giger2-150x150.jpg
Heimkiller and High

giger-150x150.jpg
The Man Who Paints Monsters In The Night

ruppert-giger-150x150.jpg
Hans by Sibylle

mathieux-marie1-150x150.jpg
The art of Jean-Michel Mathieux-Marie

rimbault2-150x150.jpg
Gilles Rimbault redux

goodwin7-150x150.jpg
Albert Goodwin’s fantasies

cat08-150x150.jpg
The art of Roland Cat

gleeson1-150x150.jpg
The art of James Gleeson, 1915–2008

sime2-150x150.jpg
Sidney Sime paintings

chrobak1-150x150.jpg
The art of Joanna Chrobak

giger21-150x150.jpg
Giger’s Tarot

giger3-150x150.jpg
Giger’s Necronomicon

cole1-150x150.jpg
The art of Thomas Cole, 1801–1848

bertrand17-150x150.jpg
Raymond Bertrand paintings

bertrand15-150x150.jpg
Raymond Bertrand’s science fiction covers

hoffman-150x150.jpg
Visionaries: The Art of the Fantastic

starowieyski1-150x150.jpg
Starowieyski in Switzerland

toledo1-150x150.jpg
The art of Luis Toledo

brissot2-150x150.jpg
Jacques Brissot’s Hay Wain

styrsky2-150x150.jpg
The art of Jindrich Styrsky, 1899–1942

venosa-150x150.jpg
The art of Robert Venosa, 1936–2011

harter4-150x150.jpg
Initiations in the Abyss: A Surrealist Apocalypse

pennington-eschatus1-150x150.jpg
The fantastic and apocalyptic art of Bruce Pennington

kryvosej1-150x150.jpg
The art of Leonidas Kryvosej

johfra1-150x150.jpg
The art of Johfra Bosschart, 1919–1998

zotl-150x150.jpg
The art of Aloys Zötl, 1803–1887

ruppert1-1-150x150.jpg
Sibylle Ruppert revisited

ruppert1-150x150.jpg
Sibylle Ruppert, 1942–2011

williams-150x150.jpg
In the Land of Retinal Delights

rimbault1-150x150.jpg
Gilles Rimbault revisited

wittfooth1-150x150.jpg
The art of Martin Wittfooth

willink1-150x150.jpg
The art of Carel Willink, 1900–1983

satty2-150x150.jpg
Wilfried Sätty: Artist of the occult

akiyoshi1-150x150.jpg
The art of Ran Akiyoshi, 1922–1982

rimbault1-150x150.jpg
The art of Gilles Rimbault

hutter1-150x150.jpg
The art of Michael Hutter

heffernan-150x150.jpg
Boy, O Boy by Julie Heffernan

leon1-150x150.jpg
The art of Jim Leon, 1938–2002

ernst-150x150.jpg
Surrealist echoes

hogin1-150x150.jpg
The art of Laurie Hogin

minnen1-150x150.jpg
The art of Christian rex Van Minnen

fini-150x150.jpg
Angels of Anarchy: Women Artists and Surrealism

denysenko1-150x150.jpg
The art of Oleg Denysenko

schuiten1-150x150.jpg
The art of François Schuiten

ruppert1-150x150.jpg
The art of Sibylle Ruppert

redon1-150x150.jpg
The eyes of Odilon Redon

foerester-150x150.jpg
Fata Morgana: The New Female Fantasists

starowieyski-150x150.jpg
Franciszek Starowieyski, 1930–2009

indrikov2-150x150.jpg
The art of Boris Indrikov

abraxas.thumbnail.pg
The art of Mati Klarwein, 1932–2002

clayette3.thumbnail.pg
The art of Pierre Clayette, 1930–2005

hpl1.thumbnail.pg
The monstrous tome

dadd.thumbnail.jpg
A Midsummer Night’s Dadd

ian_miller6.thumbnail.jpg
The art of Ian Miller

fini.thumbnail.jpg
The art of Leonor Fini, 1907–1996

henricot1.thumbnail.jpg
The art of Michel Henricot

taillefer.thumbnail.jpg
The art of Heidi Taillefer

hoenerloh.thumbnail.jpg
Set in Stone

sculpture.thumbnail.jpg
Against Nature: The hybrid forms of modern sculpture

faccon1.thumbnail.jpg
The art of Jean-Paul Faccon

severynko1.jpg
The art of Andrew Severynko

gammell.jpg
The Hound of Heaven by RH Ives Gammell

carries_frog.jpg
The art of Jean Carriès, 1855–1894

hyde.jpg
Visions and the art of Nick Hyde

heffernan1.jpg
The art of Julie Heffernan

brewer.jpg
Custom creatures

hitchcock.jpg
The art of Harold Hitchcock

arrivabene1.jpg
The art of Agostino Arrivabene

yamamoto3.jpg
The art of Takato Yamamoto

nobeast1.jpg
The art of NoBeast

airship.jpg
A Madmen’s Museum

avinoff1.jpg
The art of Andrey Avinoff, 1884–1949

berrini.jpg
Imaginary maps by Francesca Berrini

sultana.jpg
The art of Jacques Sultana

larkin_fantastic.jpg
Fantastic art from Pan Books

benoit11.jpg
The art of Jean Benoît

.jpg
The art of Bertrand

matter1.jpg
Pierre Matter’s cyborg sculpture

hernandez1.jpg
The art of José Hernández

czanara.jpg
Czanara’s Hermaphrodite Angel

aparin1.jpg
The art of Sergei Aparin

verlato.jpg
The art of Nicola Verlato

aldrich.jpg
The art of Stephen Aldrich

hausner1.jpg
The art of Rudolf Hausner, 1914–1995

desmazieres1.thumbnail.jpg
The art of Erik Desmazières

codex.jpg
The Codex Seraphinianus

tanning.jpg
Surrealist women

leonora.jpg
Leonora Carrington

cole_goblet.jpg
Two American paintings

lucifer.jpg
The art of Thomas Häfner, 1928–1985

alemany.jpg
The art of Arnau Alemany

ricaud1.jpg
The art of Jean Louis Ricaud

trignac1.jpg
The art of Gérard Trignac

emoto.jpg
The Museum of Fantastic Specimens

Arch_Evil.jpg
The art of Franz Xavier Messerschmidt, 1736–1783

fuchs-janus.jpg
The art of Ernst Fuchs

Labattoir.jpg
The art of Jean-Marie Poumeyrol

magritte.jpg
Las Pozas and Edward James

jpu.jpg
The art of Jean-Pierre Ugarte

ljuba.jpg
The art of Ljuba Popovic

Stanislav_Szukalski.jpg
The art of Stanislav Szukalski, 1893–1987

More archive pages:
The archive page archive

The art of Paul Noble

noble1.jpg

A (2002), etching.

During the last six years, British artist Paul Noble has invented a city. Named for its creator, Nobson Newtown comprises extremely large and meticulously crafted pencil drawings, each depicting a different building or location within Noble’s fictitious industrial town built on the edge of a forest. Although they are precisely rendered in realistic detail, Noble’s creations are much more than a feat in naturalistic representation. They embody the sly wit that characterizes the best of British satire. Each blocky construction is crafted out of a grouping of letters that identifies its owner or function. Each structure is then individually modified to take on the needs of its inhabitants in ways that often render its name unreadable. Representing a utopian vision gone awry, Nobson Newtown is a meditation on city planning, modernism, and life at the turn of the twenty-first century.

Noble’s work is currently on display at the Site Gallery, Sheffield (details below).

noble2.jpg

Ye Olde Ruin, (detail) (2003-04), pencil on paper.

In the City of Last Things
Katja Davar, Paul Noble, Torsten Slama
9 Sep–21 Oct 2006

Katja Davar, Paul Noble and Torsten Slama use drawing and animation to present projections of alternative urban and social possibilities. Skirting dystopia, perhaps closer to the literal meaning of utopia as ‘no place’ the artists project personal no places which blend flawed utopian fantasies and altered ecosystems and which question the possibilities for perfected urban-industrial societies.

Forking Ocean Path is a new body of work by Katja Davar comprising 3D animation and large-scale drawings. These works address the self-destructive nature of mankind and posit a possible outcome. Making reference to Leonardo da Vinci’s treatise on water, which addresses the integration of land and sea, Davar presents an undersea world devoid of human life. In one animation, a creature, part marine and part machine, slowly floats upwards through the remnants of an industrial city at the bottom of the ocean. The imagery is poignant and the short, silent animation is an understated reminder of the precariousness of our civilisation and the force of natural phenomena. The animations are set within carefully designed three dimensional screens which enhance the enigmatic combination of traditional drawing and sophisticated computer-aided animation.

Paul Noble’s Unified Nobson is an animation that ‘unifies’ the various sections that make up Nobson Newtown, the fantastical town depicted through drawings on paper. Named for its creator, Nobson Newtown comprises extremely large and meticulously crafted pencil drawings, each depicting a different building or location within Noble’s fictitious industrial town. Modelled on the new towns devised in the early 20th century to create a perfect fusion of the urban and rural, the drawings offer aerial perspectives over a fantastical cityscape in which each blocky construction is crafted out of a grouping of letters that identifies its owner or function. Representing a utopian vision gone awry, Nobson Newtown is a meditation on city planning, modernism, and the possibilities for renewal within dysfunction.

Torsten Slama’s coloured pencil drawings from the cycle Gardens of Machine Culture are inspired by Chinese paintings and recall the aesthetics of vintage science fiction. Modernist architecture and industrial constructions merge with rocky, cyclopean landscapes, sparsely grown with arboreal vegetation. Even if there are no humans on the scene; the buildings, just like the rocks and the muscular, sinewy trees function as their dignified, mineral or vegetable counterparts, as the individual personalities of which this civilisation constitutes itself. The depicted worlds are anti-cities in which industry and architecture, like the humans who built them, are part of an evolved nature.

The exhibition title references the dystopian city in Paul Auster’s novel In the Country of Last Things—’a haunting picture of a devastated futuristic world which chillingly shadows our own’ in which the ‘last things’ in the title refers not only to the disappearance of manufactured objects and technology but also the fading of memories of them and the words used to describe them.

Katja Davar was born in London and now lives and works in Cologne.

Paul Noble was born in Dilston, Northumberland and lives and works in London.

Torsten Slama was born in Schwarzach, Austria and lives and works in Berlin.

In collaboration with The Drawing Room, London.

Previously on { feuilleton }
The art of Arnau Alemany
The art of Gérard Trignac

The art of Arnau Alemany

alemany.jpg

La raffinerie.

Since his first exhibition in Barcelona in 1978, Spanish artist Arnau Alemany has dedicated himself solely to painting. In recent years, he has shown in Barcelona, Madrid, Paris, Lyon, San Francisco, New York, Chicago and Valencia, receiving second prize in the 1991 Montecar Biennial. A collection of his work also hangs in the prestigious Museum of Spanish Contemporary Art in Japan. Beginning the creative process, Alemany creates an imaginary urban landscape, either with signs of destruction or general abandonment, which are the artist’s expressions of the incompetence of city planning. Above all, he hopes to show that visual surprise is possible, through the use of magical realism.

Elsewhere on { feuilleton }
The fantastic art archive

Previously on { feuilleton }
The art of Gérard Trignac
The art of Jean-Pierre Ugarte