{ feuilleton }

Avatar

• • • Being a journal by artist and designer John Coulthart, cataloguing interests, obsessions and passing enthusiasms.


 

William Heath Robinson’s Old-Time Stories

robinson01.jpg

William Heath Robinson’s illustrated edition of Charles Perrault’s fairy tales, published in 1921, is a more substantial collection than the Dulac edition with eleven stories in all. The translator was AE Johnson who notes that three of the tales—Beauty and the Beast, The Friendly Frog, and Princess Rosette—aren’t from Perrault at all, but Beauty and the Beast by this time was part of the general canon.

Robinson’s illustrations in this particular volume are badly damaged in places but they maintain his high standard in their characterisation and use of space. A couple of the pieces are rather alarming in a book for small children: the giant crushing a village while pursuing the fleeing captives in Little Tom Thumb, and Blue Beard (again) threatening his wife with a cutlass. The imperious Puss-in-Boots is particularly good. Browse the rest of the book here or download it here.

robinson02.jpg

robinson03.jpg

robinson04.jpg

robinson05.jpg

robinson06.jpg

robinson07.jpg

robinson08.jpg

robinson09.jpg

robinson10.jpg

robinson11.jpg

robinson12.jpg

robinson13.jpg

robinson14.jpg

robinson15.jpg

robinson16.jpg

robinson17.jpg

robinson18.jpg

robinson19.jpg

Elsewhere on { feuilleton }
The illustrators archive

Previously on { feuilleton }
Edmund Dulac’s Sleeping Beauty and Other Fairy Tales
Harry Clarke’s Fairy Tales of Charles Perrault
John Austen’s Tales of Passed Times

 


 

Posted in {art}, {books}, {fantasy}, {illustrators}.

Tags: , , .

 


 


 

2 comments or trackbacks

  1. #1 posted by herr doktor bimler

    gravatar

    No criticism of Sime, but I can’t help wondering what Heath Robinson illustrations to Dunsany stories would look like.

  2. #2 posted by John

    gravatar

    I’m sure he would have done a good job although it’s debatable whether he’d achieve the weirdness of some of Sime’s drawings. I find Sime to be a little too whimsical at times but he was weird enough for Lovecraft to mention him in his stories. I’ve never seen anything in WHR that might have appealed in the same way.

 




 

tracker

 


 

“feed your head”