{ feuilleton }


• • • Being a journal by artist and designer John Coulthart, cataloguing interests, obsessions and passing enthusiasms.


Deutsche Kunst und Dekoration #11


Continuing the delve into back numbers of Deutsche Kunst und Dekoration, the German periodical of art and decoration. Volume 11 covers the period from October 1902 to March 1903, and is almost solely devoted to the many design exhibits from the Prima Esposizione Internazionale d’Arte Decorativa Moderna, a major exposition held in Turin in the summer of 1902. As with the Secession work in the previous edition, many of the featured pieces here are familiar from books about the art and design of the period but DK&D shows them in greater detail. Peter Behrens’ vestibule (above) is one of these, a very advanced design which looks ahead to the stylisations of Art Deco. As before, anyone wishing to see these samples in greater detail is advised to download the entire volume at the Internet Archive. There’ll be more DK&D next week.


The vestibule ceiling panel.


Another Behrens design which would have still looked modern twenty years later.



Furniture designs by Carlo Bugatti, father of the car manufacturer. Many Bugatti designs are strikingly unique and wouldn’t look out of place in David Lynch’s Dune. One of his bed designs was used in a film, being the sickbed of the ill-fated Lucy in Francis Ford Coppola’s Dracula.




Designs by Philippe Wolfers (above and below). Wolfers’ exotic and often macabre jewellery has featured here before, and I’d thought of gathering pictures of his peacock lamp so this has forced my hand. The manufactured item differs slightly from the sketched design with a figure whose brazen pose was modified by a conveniently placed peacock wing. Several variations on the design exist but this was the original.



More familiar jewellery and another peacock, standing guard over René Lalique’s amazing dragonfly.


This edition finishes with many pages of book designs.

Previously on { feuilleton }
Deutsche Kunst und Dekoration #10: Turin and Vienna
Deutsche Kunst und Dekoration #10: Heinrich Vogeler
Deutsche Kunst und Dekoration #9
Deutsche Kunst und Dekoration #8
Deutsche Kunst und Dekoration #7
Deutsche Kunst und Dekoration #6
Deutsche Kunst und Dekoration #5
Deutsche Kunst und Dekoration #4
Deutsche Kunst und Dekoration #2
Deutsche Kunst und Dekoration #1
Deutsche Kunst und Dekoration
Jugend Magazine revisited
The art of Philippe Wolfers, 1858–1929
Lalique’s dragonflies



Posted in {architecture}, {art nouveau}, {books}, {design}, {fashion}, {film}, {magazines}, {typography}.

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5 comments or trackbacks

  1. #1 posted by Gabriel McCann


    ‘…wouldn’t look out of place in David Lynch’s Dune.”
    or Douglas Adams’ Starship Titanic

  2. #2 posted by John


    That style would suit a lot of future scenarios. Lynch’s Dune came to mind since the designs there are a particular blend of the futuristic and the antique. The emperor’s throne room borrowed the look of Hans Poelzig’s Großes Schauspielhaus.

  3. #4 posted by Gabriel McCann


    Großes Schauspielhaus
    reminds me a bit of the inside of


  4. #5 posted by Leonard Greco


    You once again have offered rare treats, Behren’s figurative vestibule calls to mind Lalique’s dragonfly, in the sweep of its gesture. I am unfamiliar with Behren, happy for the introduction.
    Bugatti has been well loved here in Babylon for many years, always inspires me , if nothing else to daydreams.
    Lalique’s articulated marvel is of course just that, love seeing it piled upon other wonders.






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