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• • • Being a journal by artist and designer John Coulthart, cataloguing interests, obsessions and passing enthusiasms.


 

Deutsche Kunst und Dekoration #10: Heinrich Vogeler

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Continuing the delve into back numbers of Deutsche Kunst und Dekoration, the German periodical of art and decoration. Volume 10 covers the period from April to September 1902. There’s so much of interest in this edition I thought it worth making a two-part post. The number opens with a substantial piece devoted to artist and illustrator Heinrich Vogeler (1872–1942) whose edition of Oscar Wilde stories was featured here a while ago. One of the pleasures of this journal is the attention they devote to overlooked artists. Vogeler has an unusual and distinctive style, playful and florid, and with the same enthusiasm for filling the paper with tiny details as later illustrators such as Harry Clarke. Some of these illustrations are for fairy stories, others for more adult fare; peacocks abound. The article also has examples of his painted work although I find his line drawing to be of greater interest. As before, anyone wishing to see these samples in greater detail is advised to download the entire volume at the Internet Archive. Part two follows tomorrow.

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Elsewhere on { feuilleton }
The illustrators archive

Previously on { feuilleton }
Deutsche Kunst und Dekoration #9
Deutsche Kunst und Dekoration #8
Deutsche Kunst und Dekoration #7
Deutsche Kunst und Dekoration #6
Deutsche Kunst und Dekoration #5
Deutsche Kunst und Dekoration #4
Deutsche Kunst und Dekoration #2
Deutsche Kunst und Dekoration #1
Deutsche Kunst und Dekoration
Jugend Magazine revisited
Heinrich Vogeler’s illustrated Wilde

 


 

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7 comments or trackbacks

  1. #1 posted by Gabriel McCann

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    The mermaid looks a bit sexy. Wouldn’t have gone out of place in that Promethea issue with all the sensous illustrations. Now which issue was that one?
    :-)

  2. #2 posted by John

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    The mermaid is specifically Melusine, one of those magical fish-women who populate folk tales. Less lethal than some of her sisters.

  3. #3 posted by Gabriel McCann

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    Song to the Siren (acoustic version)

    http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=vMTEtDBHGY4

  4. #4 posted by John

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    Tim rules. The existence of those few minutes of film validates the entirety of the Monkees project.

  5. #5 posted by TJ

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    Incredible stuff. Very eye-opening to see what was going on in Germany in the era before WW1. Damn … tragic how much was lost in the next half-century.

  6. #6 posted by p gaye tapp

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    much to take in-beyond say Beardsley, it all carries with it that Teutonic mythology of old Germany-some fear and foreboding about the other side of the paper- the heavenly host is scaring her sheperds and flock into submission. I do so love this era. Beautiful images.

 


 

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